Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Kim Ung-Yong: Attended University at age 4, Ph.D at age 15 scored world’s highest IQ


This Korean super-genius was born in 1962 and might just be the smartest guy alive today (he’s recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as having the highest IQ of anyone on the planet). By the age of four he was already able to read in Japanese, Korean, German, and English. At his fifth birthday, he solved complicated differential and integral calculus problems. Later, on Japanese television, he demonstrated his proficiency in Chinese, Spanish, Vietnamese, Tagalog, German, English, Japanese, and Korean. Kim was listed in the Guinness Book of World Records under “Highest IQ”; the book estimated the boy’s score at over 210. 

Kim was a guest student of physics at Hanyang University from the age of 3 until he was 6. At the age of 7 he was invited to America by NASA. When he was four years old, his father said he had memorized about 2000 words in both English and German. He was writing poetry in Korean and Chinese and wrote two very short books of essays and poems (less than 20 pages).
                 

 He finished his university studies, eventually getting a Ph.D. in physics before he was 15. In 1974, during his university studies, he began his research work at NASA and continued this work until his return to Korea in 1978 where he decided to switch from physics to civil engineering and eventually received a doctorate in that field. Kim was offered the chance to study at the most prestigious universities in Korea, but instead chose to attend a provincial university. As of 2007 he also serves as adjunct faculty at Chungbuk National University.

Kim Ung-yong is a Korean civil engineer and former child prodigy. Kim was listed in the Guinness Book of World Records under "Highest IQ"; the book gave the boy's score as about 210.

References:
  1. Jump up
    "What ever became of 'geniuses'?. Time. December 19, 1977. Retrieved 2011-05-14. "South Korea's Kim Ung-Yong, a 14-year-old prodigy who was speaking four languages and solving integral calculus problems at age four, is said to tip the mental scales at 210, worth a mention in the Guinness Book of World Records."
  2. Jump up
    Knight, Sam (10 April 2009). "Is a high IQ a burden as much as a blessing?". Financial Times (Financial Times Ltd).
  3. Jump up to:
     "Korean genius, 4, poses problem for high school". The Washington Post. AP. April 10, 1967.

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